Events

The Impact of Masers in Modern Astrophysics

 I will describe the discovery of cosmic masers in 1965 and their subsequent use as probes of astrophysical phenomena. I will concentrate on two topics: the measurement of magnetic field strength in regions of star formation and the measurements of the masses and distances to black holes in the centers of active galaxies through the Keplerian motions of their associated water vapor masers. The archetypical maser of this type is associated with the galaxy NGC4258. It was discovered in 1984 by Fred Lo and his collaborators at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory.

Speaker: 
James Moran
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Place: 
KIAA-PKU Auditorium

From relativistic heavy ion collision to antimatter production

Relativistic heavy ion collider provides a unique venue to form a new kind of matter, namely the quark-gluon plasma, and while abundant antimatter could be produced. At BNL-Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), head-on collisions of gold ions moving at nearly the speed of light simulate the conditions of a plasma of the smallest components of matter — the quarks and gluons. Abundant antinucleons can be produced after cooling down of the quark-gluon plasma that has the excellent capability of conducting the hunt of antimatter nuclei and studying interaction between antiprotons.

Speaker: 
Yu-Gang Ma
Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics
Place: 
KIAA-PKU Auditorium

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